all 18 comments

[–]paulcibis 14 points15 points ago

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Thomas Vinterberg's The Celebration would be an important film to add to this list, since it was the 1st (and I think best) of the Dogme 95 movies. It was shot on a Sony DCR-PC7E. Really a great film. Worth a watch even if this wasn't the theme of the month.

[–]girafa[S] 1 point2 points ago

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Awesome, thanks. There are a few I haven't seen so I couldn't recommend them- that one, Personal Velocity, and a couple others.

[–]urbanplowboy 4 points5 points ago

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Just some minor corrections: According to IMDB.com, 28 Days Later was shot (partially) with the Canon XL-1s and not the VX1000. Also, the DV standard records at 720x480 (not taking the PAL version into account), not 640x480, with a non-square (meaning not 1:1) pixel ratio. This intermediate non-square ratio allowed the footage to be flagged and played out as either 4:3 (effectively 640x480 resolution) or 16:9 (853x480), which was a pretty important step towards emulating the widescreen film look at the time.

[–]girafa[S] 1 point2 points ago

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I didn't want to go nuts with tech details, I know dv is 720x480 but with the pixel aspect ratio it displays at 640x480. Widescreen wasn't as popular back then, nor were the resolutions of tvs high enough for it to matter. Also I claimed that 28 Days Later used the vx2000, which I learned from many articles/interviews at the time (I had one, was proud of it). They didn't exclusively use it though, hell the end was shot on film!

[–]urbanplowboy 1 point2 points ago

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Not that it matters, but I remember hearing/reading the exact same thing about 28 Days Later using the XL-1 at the time and I can only seem to find info now saying they did use the XL-1 and nothing saying they used the VX1000.

EDIT: I just realized I've been mentioning the VX1000 when you said the VX2000, but that doesn't really change my point.

[–]girafa[S] 0 points1 point ago

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Aight aight, I'll change it.

[–]radd_it 1 point2 points ago

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listr provided as a convenience, downvote to have it removed.

[–]A_Evil_Laugh 3 points4 points ago

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Series 7 is such a great premise and very well executed film, but unfortunately it was just made about 3 years to early. It's a perfect parody of reality TV of the early 2000s (Survivor, The Mole, etc.) but it just looks really outdated today. I wish the director knew about current reality tropes like the one-on-one interviews, fake dialogue and forced storylines.

As it stands though, it's a perfectly shot and edited film to look exactly like reality TV of 2003. It's just far too old fashioned even by today's standards.

[–]XInsects 4 points5 points ago

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Just to throw in some thoughts. For me, DV has a massive pro, and a massive con.

The pro is that is enables talented film makers to create more spontaneous and organic material - using the instant ease of DV to express themselves and capture ideas/performances more fully. E.g. something like Inland Empire. I wonder how often the pressure/expense/effort of film shooting stifles ideas for how to shoot something (budgetwise) and performances (becoming overly conscious under pressure).

The con is that it also enables filmmakers who exploit the ease of DV. I.e. incredibly poor quality on all levels, because they rush in impatiently. People who want to say something (or make a movie) but have nothing to say. I'm often surprised when people talk about some "low budget indie gem winning awards" etc, then when I watch the trailer it looks shocking, like a bunch of friends pissing about on a weekend. One recent one on /r/movies was The Battery. I thought the trailer was horribly self-conscious, uncinematic, unoriginal, amateur and immature looking, yet people were all over it.

[–]SomeCalcium 2 points3 points ago

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Really awesome director of the month theme. Also, as a suggestion Open Water 2 might be my favorite bad movie of all time. Perhaps one of the worst sequels ever. It's so stupid, it's beautiful

[–]mi-16evil 2 points3 points ago

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Chuck & Buck is truly incredible. I really wish Mike White was more well known outside of his usually fruitful collaborations with Jack Black. His series Enlightened was a damn masterpiece, but it seems he's forever stuck in the critical world of minor brilliant talent.

[–]XInsects 0 points1 point ago

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I was introduced to Mike White through Enlightened, which my gf and I stormed through and thoroughly enjoyed. It was just absolutely brilliant, and I'll rewatch it all again soon. I remember thinking "who is this Mr White, and why isn't he more widely known?" The writing and humanity in Enlightened seems unparalleled to me - I can't remember seeing something so observed, well judged, balanced and honest like this.

[–]Pleasureryan 2 points3 points ago

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We recently had to shoot a documentary on an old DV cam for film school, and many people complained about the quality of the image, but I've got a bit of fondness for the DV look.

I'm a big Duplass brother's fan, so my obvious input to this conversation is "The Puffy Chair" which was shot on the Panasonic AG-DVX100... The first 5 seasons of It's Always Sunny were also shot on the same camera. The camera's a bit older which makes it a fair bit more rewatchable, but it still has the nice DV look

[–]IntellegentIdiot 1 point2 points ago

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Kids today don't know how lucky they are. When I was in school we were lucky enough to have these huge Super VHS cameras to use at times. We had to do tape-to-tape editing via a nice mixing desk. A few years later DV came along and gave us better quality and everything could be uploaded straight to a computer. Now everything is digital and you can buy a camera for next to nothing. A HD camera like the Flip would give you better image quality than anything before and you can instantly edit the footage. You don't even need a separate camera, most phones can shoot video at varying quality.

[–]arriflex 0 points1 point ago

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I'm glad someone mentioned the DVX100- the first camera to bring true 24p (without some flavor of field doubling voodo) to the prosumer market. It was a workhorse in industrial and reality as well for years (and years and years).

[–]Lovelocke64 2 points3 points ago

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Not trying to toot my own horn, but I'm a filmmaker and my movie "GRIM" was shot with a Canon XHA1... the same camera used to film the Jason Statham action movie "Crank".

We had our big "world premiere" in Santa Monica, CA at the Action on Film Festival and got three award nominations there for Best Cinematography, Best Villain, and Best Special Effects... all for a movie that cost $2,500 to put together. We lost across the board of course... to movies that cost $500,000+.

Eh, I guess you can AmA, though in the past Reddit's been unkind to filmmakers submitting their own projects.

[–]gregphipps37 1 point2 points ago

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Richard Linklater directed Tape in 2001, based on a play that takes place in a hotel room, in real time, starring Ethan Hawke and Uma Thurman. It was shot on a Sony DSR-PD100A

[–]Arashan 0 points1 point ago

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All of the exterior scenes in Michael Mann's Collateral were shot with a Thomson Grass Valley Viper FilmStream. I think some interior scenes as well (the nightclub fight certainly feels like).